FREE SUSTAINABLE ENERGY




Sustainable energy

is the sustainable provision of energy that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs. Technologies that promote sustainable energy include renewable energy sources, such as hydroelectricitysolarenergywind energywave powergeothermalenergy, and tidal power, and also technologies designed to improve energy efficiency.




March 20, 2013 
From: Tafline Laylin, Green Prophet 
Shams 1: World's Largest Concentrated Solar Plant Goes Live



The Shams 1 Concentrated Solar Plant (CSP) in Abu Dhabi is the largest of its kind in the world and it has finally gone live. Green Prophet visited the 100MW plant in the western region of the United Arab Emirates earlier this year as part of a Masdar-sponsored media tour during the World Future Energy Summit (WFES), and we were deeply impressed with the project's progressive scope and size.


With 258,000 mirrors on 768 tracking parabolic trough collectors harnessing the sun's energy to power a steam turbine, the plant developed by Shams Power Company occupies an area of 2.5 square kilometers or 285 football fields. Now that it is live, it is expected to generate sufficient energy to power 20,000 homes and divert 170,000 tons of CO2 emissions from the atmosphere each year. 
It cost $600 million USD and took three years to build Shams 1 about 120km outside of Abu Dhabi. It features the most current parabolic trough technology, which made the most sense at the time that the project was conceived, and includes a natural gas-powered booster that maximizes the steam generation's efficiency. 
Masdar owns 60 percent of the plant, while Total and Abengoa each have a 20 percent stake in what Masdar claims is the largest plant of its kind. 
"The inauguration of Shams 1 is a major breakthrough for renewable energy in the Middle East," said Dr. Sultan Ahmed Al Jaber, CEO of Masdar. 
"Just like the rest of the word, the region is faced with meeting its rising demand for energy, while also working to reduce its carbon footprint. Shams 1 is a significant milestone, as large-scale renewable energy is proving it can deliver electricity that is sustainable, affordable and secure." 
Probably more than any other Gulf nation, the United Arab Emirates has employed an aggressive strategy to scale up its renewable energy portfolio. 
Not only are several solar power plants in the works, but in January the government-backed Masdar initiative announced plans to develop desalination plants that are powered by clean energy to further reduce fossil fuel consumption. 
"Abu Dhabi is investing and incubating a new energy industry, domestically and internationally," said Dr. Al Jaber. 
"Through Masdar, the UAE is redefining the role it plays in providing the world with energy. From precious hydrocarbon exports to sophisticated renewable energy systems, we are balancing the energy mix and diversifying our economy - moving toward a more sustainable future. Today, the UAE is the only OPEC nation delivering both hydrocarbons and renewable energy to the international market.” 
Now that Shams 1 is online, renewable energy produced by Masdar accounts for 68 percent of the Gulf’s capacity and 10 percent of the world’s CSP capacity. This is in part due to projects that Masdar has partnered with abroad, including the GemasolarCSP plant in Spain
“The Middle East holds nearly half of the world’s renewable energy potential,” said Santiago Seage, CEO of Abengoa Solar. “The abundance of solar energy is an opportunity to integrate sustainable, clean sources of power that address energy security and climate change. The region needs more projects like Shams 1, and we look forward to pushing the boundaries of future energy.”


Continue reading at Green Prophet.

Solar panel image via Shutterstock.

Mar 5th, 2013 



Were you really hoping this was going to save your First World lifestyle? 
A series of recently released studies make it clear that wind power is not going to save us—not from global warming, not from high extinction rates, and not from the system of high-energy-consumption industrial exploitation that is killing the planet. 
Let’s start with the most damning findings: even the most large-scale shift to wind power cannot slow greenhouse gas emissions enough to have any positive effect on the climate, although it may manage to make things worse. 
Why? 
study published in Nature Climate Change in September found that although hypothetically there is enough power in the earth’s winds to sustain current levels of energy consumption, in practice you could never harvest enough energy from wind to affect the climate: 
Turbines create drag, or resistance, which removes momentum from the winds and tends to slow them. As the number of wind turbines increases, the amount of energy that is generated increases. But at some point, the winds would be slowed so much that adding more turbines will not generate more electricity. … 
[T]he study found that the climate effects of extracting wind energy at the level of current global demand would be small, as long as the turbines were spread out and not clustered in just a few regions. At the level of global energy demand, wind turbines might affect surface temperatures by about 0.2 degrees Fahrenheit and affect precipitation by about 1 percent.Overall, the environmental impacts would not be substantial. (emphasis added) 
Another study, published in Nature last month, found that wind farms being constructed in Scotland actually lead to a net increase in carbon dioxide emissions: 
  • Wind farms are typically built on upland sites, where peat soil is common. In Scotland alone, two thirds of all planned onshore wind development is on peatland. England and Wales also have large numbers of current or proposed peatland wind farms. 
  • But peat is also a massive store of carbon, described as Europe’s equivalent of the tropical rainforest. Peat bogs contain and absorb carbon in the same way as trees and plants — but in much higher quantities. 
  • British peatland stores at least 3.2 billion tons of carbon, making it by far the country’s most important carbon sink and among the most important in the world. 
  • Wind farms, and the miles of new roads and tracks needed to service them, damage or destroy the peat and cause significant loss of carbon to the atmosphere, where it contributes to climate change. …
  • Richard Lindsay of the University of East London, said … “The world’s peatlands have four times the amount of carbon than all the world’s rainforests. But they are a Cinderella habitat, completely invisible to decision- makers.”
  • Finally, a study published last month in the journal Environmental Research Letters conducted a further analysis on the effects of wind turbine drag:
  • Each wind turbine creates behind it a “wind shadow” in which the air has been slowed down by drag on the turbine’s blades. The ideal wind farm strikes a balance, packing as many turbines onto the land as possible, while also spacing them enough to reduce the impact of these wind shadows. But as wind farms grow larger, they start to interact, and the regional-scale wind patterns matter more.
  • Keith’s research has shown that the generating capacity of very large wind power installations (larger than 100 square kilometers) may peak at between 0.5 and 1 watts per square meter. Previous estimates, which ignored the turbines’ slowing effect on the wind, had put that figure at between 2 and 7 watts per square meter. 
In short, we may not have access to as much wind power as scientists thought. … 
“If wind power’s going to make a contribution to global energy requirements that’s serious, 10 or 20 percent or more, then it really has to contribute on the scale of terawatts in the next half-century or less,” says Keith. 
If we were to cover the entire Earth with wind farms, he notes, “the system could potentially generate enormous amounts of power, well in excess of 100 terawatts, but at that point my guess, based on our climate modeling, is that the effect of that on global winds, and therefore on climate, would be severe — perhaps bigger than the impact of doubling CO2.” (emphasis added)


Offshore wind turbines 
As if that weren’t enough, another study has just concluded that large wind turbines constructed offshore may snap like matches when hit by medium-size waves: 
“If we do not take ringing into consideration, offshore wind turbine parks can lead to financial ruin,” warns John Grue to the research magazineApollon at University of Oslo. … 
Ringing does not just harm wind turbines. Ringing has already been a great problem for the oil industry. The designers of the YME platform did not tak ringing into account, and lost NOK 12 billion. 
“It is possible to build your way out of the ringing problem by strengthening the oil rigs. However, it is not financially profitable to do the same with wind turbines,” says John Grue. 
And finally, let’s not forget what environmentalists have been warning about for decades: windturbines murder birds
ReWire has learned that the North Sky River Wind project, which attracted fierce opposition from environmental groups concerned about potential threat to eagles and California condors, was the site of a golden eagle death in January. … 
The eagle kill apparently occurred on January 29, just a month after North Sky River started generating power. 
So what’s the solution?  
The solution is to dramatically scale back consumption and shift to local-based economies not dependent upon stealing resources from distant people and lands. 

April 4, 2013
Alex Pietrowski, Staff Writer
WakingTimes 




Researchers at Virginia Tech have developed a new process that extracts large quantities of hydrogen gas from plants in a renewableand eco-friendly way, offering us another potential alternative to ending our dependence on fossil fuels. 
After 7 years of research, Y.H. Percival Zhang, an associate professor at the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and the College of Engineering at Virginia Tech, and his team have developed a new method of using customized enzymes to produce high quantities of hydrogen out of xylose, a simple sugar present in plants. 
Zhang and his team have succeeded in using xylose, the most abundant simple plant sugar, to produce a large quantity of hydrogen that previously was attainable only in theory. Zhang’s method can be performed using any source of biomass. 
This new environmentally friendly method of producing hydrogen utilizes renewable natural resources, releases almost no zero greenhouse gasses, and does not require costly or heavy metals. Previous methods to produce hydrogen are expensive and create greenhouse gases. 
March 28, 2012 
Hydrogen fuel has the potential to dramatically revolutionize the automobile market and reduce our dependenceon fossil fuels. Vehicle manufacturers are already developing cars that run on hydrogen fuel cells, which do not produce as many pollutants as regular gasoline cars. Currently in the US, the transportation sector produces 82% of total CO2 emissions in the country. 
EIA estimates that U.S. gasoline and diesel fuel consumption for transportation in 2011 resulted in the emission of about 1,089 and 430 million metric tons of CO2 respectively, for a total of 1,519 million metric tons of CO2. This total was equivalent to 82% of total CO2 emissions by the U.S. transportation sector and 28% of total U.S. energy-related CO2 emissions.
Zhang’s method of hydrogen production will need to find its way into commercial markets, which could happen in about 3 years, before any significant impact on the alternative energy market is possible. Even though Zhang’s process addresses the previous obstacles to hydrogen gas production, including high process costs, greenhouse gas emissions, and low quality of the end product, large investment in technology development and infrastructure would still be necessary to transition to hydrogen fuel cars. 
“The potential for profit and environmental benefits are why so many automobile, oil, and energy companies are working on hydrogen fuel cell vehicles as the transportation of the future,” Zhang said. “Many people believe we will enter the hydrogen economy soon, with a market capacity of at least $1 trillion in the United States alone.” 
“It really doesn’t make sense to use non-renewable natural resources to produce hydrogen,” Zhang said. “We think this discovery is a game-changer in the world of alternative energy.” [ScienceDaily
A future where renewable energy replaces energy production using fossil fuels is inevitable. Some have gone as far as to illustrate that we have the potential to make this shift in less than 20 years, for example, Mark Z. Jacobson of Stanford University and Mark A. Delucchi of the University of California, publisheda study that shows it is possible to power New York State using only renewable sources by 2030. 
Nevertheless, governments’ support of traditional energy production via fossil fuel subsidies, which amount to $1.9 trillion per year, as reported by theInternational Monetary Fund, is one of the main obstacles to the growth of alternative energy sources. The IMF estimates that $480 billion of the total is comprised of direct subsidies, which have the goal of making petroleum products more affordable. 
A fossil fuel subsidy is any government action that lowers the cost of fossil fuel energy production, raises the price received by energy producers or lowers the price paid by energy consumers. There are a lot of activities under this simple definition—tax breaks and giveaways, but also loans at favorable rates, price controls, purchase requirements and a whole lot of other things. [Oil Change International
The remaining $1.4 trillion are comprised of “externalities”: “the effects of energy consumption on global warming; on public health through the adverse effects on local pollution; on traffic congestion and accidents; and on road damage.” (IMF) Current energy policies are established in such a way that fossil fuel companies do not pay for any of these “externalities”, and thus leaving these industry costs to be indirectly subsidized by governments. 
Here are some more statistics about the energy subsidies in the US:
“…between 1994 and 2009 the U.S. oil and gas industries received a cumulative $446.96 billion in subsidies, compared to just $5.93 billion given to renewables in those years. (The nuclear industry, by the way.  received $185 billion in federal subsidies between 1947 and 1999.)” Source: Forbes 
  • With such policies in place, heavily influenced by large multi-billion dollar companies with strong government ties, is a rapid change towards renewable energy even possible? 
  • Are we ready to challenge our policies to shift financial support from harmful and damaging energy production to renewable technologies, and change our own behaviors to create a cohesive movement towards a cleaner and safer planet? 
If breakthroughs in technology can offer salient alternatives to the economic stranglehood fossil fuels has on our economy, then we may realize a future of clean energy. One thing is certain, however, without practical alternatives there is no chance of changing the momentum behind extraction based energy toward clean energy. 
Sources:
HERE | HERE | HERE | HERE | HERE | HERE | HERE

Related Posts:

April 5, 2013 by Arjun

Clean Energy Breakthrough: Scientists Extract Hydrogen Gas From Plants
  • Free Energy - Brian O'Leary (Excerpt from THRIVE Movie) | HERE
  • Stan Meyers water powered Buggy | HERE
  • Stanley Meyer Speech - Exposing NWO and the suppression of Free Energy | HERE

Researchers at Virginia Tech have developed a breakthrough in hydrogen energy, something that has always been known to challenge fossil fuel dominance. They have developed a process that extracts large quantities of hydrogen gas from plants in an eco-friendly and renewable way. This is yet another alternative we are now aware of that could end our dependence on fossil fuels. 
Y.H. Percival Zhang is an associate professor at Virginia Tech, along with other researchers he developed a new method of using customized enzymes to produce high quantities of hydrogen out of xylose, a type of sugar that is present in plants.  The new environmentally friendly method of producing hydrogen utilizes renewable natural resources, and releases almost zero greenhouse gasses. Previous hydrogen production techniques have usually been costly and create greenhouse gasses. The discovery is a feature in an online version of the chemistry journal Angewandte Chemie, International Edition. 
The high-purity hydrogen is developed under reaction conditions at 122 degrees Fahrenheit and normal atmospheric pressure. A group of enzymes that are artificially isolated from different micro-organisms that thrive at extreme temperatures are used as biocatalysts that can thrive and grow at around the boiling point of water. To liberate the hydrogen from the planet, scientists separated multiple enzymes from their native micro-organisms to make an enzyme mix that does not occur in nature. When the enzymes are combined with xylose (sugar from plant) and a polyphosphate they liberate the high volume of hydrogen from the xylose. This process results in the production of three times as much hydrogen as other hydrogen-producing microorganisms. 
The energy stored in xylose splits water molecules, yielding high purity hydrogen that can be directly utilized by proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Even more appealing, this reaction occurs at low temperatures, generating hydrogen energy that is greater than the chemical energy stored in xylose and the polyphosphate. This results in an energy efficiency of more than 100 percent- a net energy gain. That means that low temperature waste heat can be used to produce high quality chemical energy hydrogen for the first time. (1) 
Our new process could help end our dependence on fossil forever. Hydrogen is one of the most important biofuels of the future – Professor Zhang 
The U.S. Department of Energy says that hydrogen fuel has the potential to dramatically change our planet and reduce reliance on fossil fuels. I personally believe that the U.S. Department of Energy has been active in the suppression of clean energy alternatives. It’s funny how we are made to believe that automobile manufacturers are aggressively trying to develop hydrogen fuel cells, because this type of technology has been invented in our not to distant past. Energy companies have their roots in suppression of new energy technology, and new energy initiatives. You don’t have to look too far, just look at General Electric. Nikola Tesla’s zero point energy discovery forced JP Morgan to burn down his lab. From there the Morgans, in partnership with the Rockefeller’s, developed their corporation into what it is today by having a monopoly on the necessary resources. 
Unfortunately, the new energy sector is hard, if not impossible to break through. Governments, which are controlled by major corporations support traditional energy production via fossil fuel subsidies. This isn’t much of a surprise, anything that has the potential to take down the energy industry and profit has always been ‘done away’ with. This isn’t a secret anymore, and many people are waking up to the fact that these companies have the ability and resources to suppress discoveries that have the potential to change the planet Earth forever. 
Collective Evolution has covered multiple alternative energy initiatives. Below is a video of Dr Brian O’leary speaking on free energy devices, also known as “zero-point” energy devices. You can read our articles on free energy by clicking here and  here
There are so many alternative ways to generate fuel, energy and every type of  ”input” we need. Yet we continue to be subject to brain washing. The same major shareholders that own big oil and energy companies also own all of our mainstream media. We continue to believe the stories and manufactured events that are presented to us without ever questioning it. But things are changing, more and more people are waking up to what already exists, and our infinite potential to create an experience that is more harmonious with the planet and our most natural state is starting to creep into our reality. Scientists have also developed a reactor that mimics plants by turning sunlight into fuel. This is another discovery that could be implemented on a mass scale simply by using the sun. You can read more about that here
Another recent alternative energy discovery are vortex induced vibrations. Scientists developed a device that can harness energy from slow-moving rivers and ocean currents, which have the ability to power the entire planet. All that is required for the technology to work is a simple water way or sea bed. The technology can generate electricity in water flowing at a rate of less than one knot. The device is made up of cylinders that are positioned horizontal to the water flow. The cylinders create vorticies as the water flows past, which allow the cylinders to be pushed and pulled up and down. The energy this action creates can be converted to electricity. Cylinders arranged over a cubic meter of the sea or river bed in a flow of three knots can produce 51 watts. This is more efficient than similar-sized turbines or wave generators and the amount of power produced can increase extensively if the flow is faster or if more cylinders are added. You can read more about it here 
Hydrogen has always had the potential to dramatically change the automobile and energy industry, as well as reduce our dependence on fossil fuels. It’s known that manufacturers and people have been developing cars that run on hydrogen fuel cells for years. Multiple inventors have been able to split water into its component elements. Stanley Meyer invented what he called a water fuel cell, a process by which electricity passed through water to produce hydrogen. He eventually died mysteriously, just like others who had the same invention. You can see some clips of Stanley below. 
The only reason the pentagon flew in a lieutenant colonel to visit Mr Meyer was to determine the legitimacy of the invention and prepare him for death. 
Sources: - HERE | HERE (1) | HERE

April 4, 2013
Breakthrough in hydrogen fuel production could revolutionize alternative energy market

BLACKSBURG, Va., April 4, 2013 – A team of Virginia Tech researchers has discovered a way to extract large quantities of hydrogen from any plant, a breakthrough that has the potential to bring a low-cost, environmentally friendly fuel source to the world. 
“Our new process could help end our dependence on fossil fuels,” said Y.H. Percival Zhang, an associate professor of biological systems engineering in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and the College of Engineering. “Hydrogen is one of the most important biofuels of the future.” 
Zhang and his team have succeeded in using xylose, the most abundant simple plant sugar, to produce a large quantity of hydrogen that previously was attainable only in theory. Zhang’s method can be performed using any source of biomass. 
The discovery is a featured editor’s choice in an online version of the chemistry journal Angewandte Chemie, International Edition
This new environmentally friendly method of producing hydrogen utilizes renewable natural resources, releases almost no greenhouse gasses, and does not require costly or heavy metals.  Previous methods to produce hydrogen are expensive and create greenhouse gases. 
The U.S. Department of Energy says that hydrogen fuel has the potential to dramatically reduce reliance on fossil fuels and automobile manufacturers are aggressively trying to develop vehicles that run on hydrogen fuel cells. Unlike gas-powered engines that spew out pollutants, the only byproduct of hydrogen fuel is water. Zhang’s discovery opens the door to an inexpensive, renewable source of hydrogen. 
Jonathan R. Mielenz, group leader of the bioscience and technology biosciences division at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, who is familiar with Zhang’s work but not affiliated with this project, said this discovery has the potential to have a major impact on alternative energy production. 
“The key to this exciting development is that Zhang is using the second most prevalent sugar in plants to produce this hydrogen,” he said. “This amounts to a significant additional benefit to hydrogen production and it reduces the overall cost of producing hydrogen from biomass.”
Mielenz said Zhang’s process could find its way to the marketplace as quickly as three years if the technology is available. Zhang said when it does become commercially available, it has the possibility of making an enormous impact. 
“The potential for profit and environmental benefits are why so many automobile, oil, and energy companies are working on hydrogen fuel cell vehicles as the transportation of the future,” Zhang said. “Many people believe we will enter the hydrogen economy soon, with a market capacity of at least $1 trillion in the United States alone.” 
Obstacles to commercial production of hydrogen gas from biomass previously included the high cost of the processes used and the relatively low quantity of the end product. 
But Zhang says he thinks he has found the answers to those problems. 
For seven years, Zhang’s team has been focused on finding non-traditional ways to produce high-yield hydrogen at low cost, specifically researching enzyme combinations, discovering novel enzymes, and engineering enzymes with desirable properties. 
The team liberates the high-purity hydrogen under mild reaction conditions at 122 degrees and normal atmospheric pressure. The biocatalysts used to release the hydrogen are a group of enzymes artificially isolated from different microorganisms that thrive at extreme temperatures, some of which could grow at around the boiling point of water. 
The researchers chose to use xylose, which comprises as much as 30 percent of plant cell walls. Despite its abundance, the use of xylose for releasing hydrogen has been limited. The natural or engineered microorganisms that most scientists use in their experiments cannot produce hydrogen in high yield because these microorganisms grow and reproduce instead of splitting water molecules to yield pure hydrogen. 
To liberate the hydrogen, Virginia Tech scientists separated a number of enzymes from their native microorganisms to create a customized enzyme cocktail that does not occur in nature.  The enzymes, when combined with xylose and a polyphosphate, liberate the unprecedentedly high volume of hydrogen from xylose, resulting in the production of about three times as much hydrogen as other hydrogen-producing microorganisms. 
The energy stored in xylose splits water molecules, yielding high-purity hydrogen that can be directly utilized by proton-exchange membrane fuel cells. Even more appealing, this reaction occurs at low temperatures, generating hydrogen energy that is greater than the chemical energy stored in xylose and the polyphosphate. This results in an energy efficiency of more than 100 percent — a net energy gain. That means that low-temperature waste heat can be used to produce high-quality chemical energy hydrogen for the first time. Other processes that convert sugar into biofuels such as ethanol and butanol always have energy efficiencies of less than 100 percent, resulting in an energy penalty. 
In his previous research, Zhang used enzymes to produce hydrogen from starch, but the reaction required a food source that made the process too costly for mass production. 
The commercial market for hydrogen gas is now around $100 billion for hydrogen produced from natural gas, which is expensive to manufacture and generates a large amount of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide. Industry most often uses hydrogen to manufacture ammonia for fertilizers and to refine petrochemicals, but an inexpensive, plentiful green hydrogen source can rapidly change that market. 
“It really doesn’t make sense to use non-renewable natural resources to produce hydrogen,” Zhang said. “We think this discovery is a game-changer in the world of alternative energy.” 
Support for the current research comes from the Department of Biological Systems Engineering at Virginia Tech. Additional resources were contributed by the Shell GameChanger Program, the Virginia Tech College of Agriculture and Life Sciences’ Biodesign and Bioprocessing Research Center, and the U.S. Department of Energy BioEnergy Science Center, along with the Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the Department of Energy.  The lead author of the article, Julia S. Martin Del Campo, who works in Zhang’s lab, received her Ph.D. grant from the Mexican Council of Science and Technology. 
Nationally ranked among the top research institutions of its kind, Virginia Tech’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences focuses on the science and business of living systems through learning, discovery, and engagement. The college’s comprehensive curriculum gives more than 3,100 students in a dozen academic departments a balanced education that ranges from food and fiber production to economics to human health. Students learn from the world’s leading agricultural scientists, who bring the latest science and technology into the classroom.
April 9, 2013


US Lags Far Behind with Renewable Energy Technologies as Portugal is Now 70% Sustainable
by Shepard Ambellas
Intellihub.com


As more and more people are brought into the world and we get yet more industrialized as a human race, we should likely plan to use advanced technologies to better the quality of life on our ever changing planet. 
Right now over 77% of our energy in America comes from fossil fuels, about 10% from nuclear, and only around 13% from renewable energy sources. 
Although current climate models and global warming trends seem to be backed by corporate sponsored figureheads such as, Al “Mr. Ozone” Gore and Bill Gates, we as humans should be using cleaner safer technologies that have been suppressed by the oilmen and major power companies for years. 
When it comes to renewable energy the United States is far behind the pack as only 3 states in the US are producing over 10% renewable energy from either water, wind, geothermal, or solar California, Iowa and North Dakota. According to Wikipedia, “The development of renewable energy and energy efficiency marks “a new era of energy exploration” in the United States, according to President Barack Obama. In a joint address to the Congress on February 24, 2009, President Obama called for doubling renewable energy within the next three years.” 
While it’s likely that president Obama is just pushing propaganda to line the pockets of his corporate cronies with American tax dollars, other countries are taking renewable energy serious, bringing it to a whole new level. 
Take Portugal for example. According to a recent report, “Portugal is the newest country to make the list of over 60% renewable electricity. According to this report by the network operator REN, it got 70% in quarter one of this year. The largest part (37%) comes from hydro, which had excellent weather conditions, leading to a 312% increase over last year’s figures. But wind also contributed 27%, with a 60% increase, also primarily due to favorable weather conditions.” 
Allot of these achievements by Portugal are literally due to how serious the countries leaders are taking the policies. In fact WorldWatch.org wrote, “Portugal has made dramatic changes in its energy policy over the last five years under the government of Prime Minister José Sócrates. The country’s installed renewable energy capacity more than tripled between 2004 and 2009, from 1,220 megawatts (MW) to 4,307 MW, and renewables now represent roughly 36 percent of electricity consumed. Portugal currently ranks fourth in Europe in energy production from renewables. 
Of course, Portugal benefits from favorable conditions for renewables: a strong wind resource, great hydropower, good tidal waves potential, and a high sunshine rate. After the country removed several dams in recent years, Sócrates’ government has focused instead on wind power development, under most conditions the cheapest renewable energy source after hydro-power. With more than 600-percent growth in wind energy production between 2004 and 2009, Portugal now ranks sixth in Europe in total installed capacity and third in capacity per capita, behind only Denmark and SpainSome even expect Portugal to overtake its neighbor Spain in per-capita wind energy production as early as this year.”

So it looks like the way things are going, Portugal has a shot at becoming the worlds first self sufficient country. And if self sufficiency is not in the best interests of other countries around the globe, then perhaps they are putting their resources to waste trying to enslave their populations. In my opinion great nations might prevail rom these technologies while others might falter.
Sources: ^HERE ^HERE ^HERE ^HERE ^HERE
  
November 18, 2011  
Nikola Tesla unlimited free energy forever | Sources : PictureYouTube Nikola Tesla unlimited free energy forever THEY dont want you to know about
22 Jan 2011
Nikola Tesla unlimited free energy forever
From Google Videos.
Lightworks Video&Audio
Hosted by Bill Jenkins, formerly of ABC Radio, this comprehensive documentary features physicists and inventors who are challenging orthodox science to bring this non-polluting technology forward despite ridicule and suppression. See actual working prototypes that defy classical physics including phenomenal experiments in anti-gravity and the transmutation of metals. | HERE


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About Octa Dandy Saiyar

Kelahiran Jakarta keturunan asli Bukittinggi, Sumatera Barat .
07 Oktober 1983.



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